My Pork Tenderloin Perfected

Hello folks and welcome back to the All Things Southern kitchen.  Do you remember all the pork tenderloin recipes we’ve shared over the years? Well, forget them. I tried a new method over the holidays and I’ll never cook a pork tenderloin any other way. I’m calling it Pork Tenderloin Perfected.

“Pork Tenderloin Perfected”

3 lb. pork tenderloin

Cajun seasonings

Crushed peppercorns

Sauce:

2 tablespoons molasses

2 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tablespoons brown sugar

1 teaspoon ginger

1 teaspoon crushed garlic

1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar

 

I’d heard about this method before, but after trying it, I’m sold. I may play around with different seasoning and sauces but I’ll cook always cook tenderloins like this.  We’ll begin by setting our oven at 550 degrees.  Then we’ll take our tenderloin and calculate cooking time. For every pound we’ll cook it for 5 1/2 minutes, no more, no less. (That’s means we’ll cook this 3 pound tenderloin 16.5 minutes.) pork

Now, we’ll prepare the tenderloin by rubbing it down with our favorite seasonings. I’m going to use salt, pepper, and a good Cajun seasoning along with some crushed peppercorns. We’ll place our rubbed tenderloin in a roasting pan, uncovered, and put it in the oven. When the time expires, we’ll turn the oven off but we won’t open the door for a solid hour. That’s the trick that will keep it cooking to perfection. After an hour, we’ll take it out and let it rest 5-10 minutes before slicing it. Simple– yet delicious.

I made a quick sauce and thickened it on the stovetop to pour over our tenderloin while it’s resting. I used molasses, soy sauce, brown sugar, ginger, garlic, and balsamic vinegar and just brought it to a boil and turned it down until it thickened.  You could also use this sauce for a marinade if you’d like, but either way, you simply must try my Pork Tenderloin Perfected! It’s good eating from the All Things Southern kitchen to yours.

Hugs, Shellie


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New Year’s Day with my Red Pepper Roast

Hey porchers, welcome back to the All Things Southern kitchen. I’ve got the perfect entrée for your New Year’s Day meal. My group likes finger foods served in front of the TV while we’re watching those bowl games so I’ll be whipping up my very pretty “Red Pepper Roast.” We’ll slice it and serve it with “Peppered Butter” on sweet Hawaiian rolls. YUM!  Let’s get cooking.

“New Year’s Red Pepper Roast”

One 4 to 5 lb. beef roast
1/3 cup Dijon mustard
4 tablespoons coarsely ground mixed peppercorns

“Peppered Butter”

6 tablespoons softened butter
¼ cup bottled roasted red peppers, dried and chopped fine
1and ½ tablespoon dried basil
1 and ½ tablespoons dried parsley

We’ll begin by rubbing a four to five pound beef roast with a third cup of Dijon Mustard. Then we’ll sprinkle it liberally with about four tablespoons of coarsely ground mixed peppercorns. Now, let’s place this on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. We’ll roast it until it registers at least 150 on a meat thermometer. It’ll take a good hour to hour and a half, depending on the size of your roast.

In the meantime, we’ll make the “Peppered Butter”. First we’ll beat about six tablespoons of butter until it’s fluffy. Then we’ll chop up a fourth cup of roasted red peppers, drain ‘em and stir ‘em in the butter with about a tablespoon and a half each of dried basil and dried parsley. That’s it. When the meat’s done, we’ll slice it very thin and serve it with our peppered butter over these fabulous rolls.  Happy New Year folks from the All Things Southern kitchen to yours!

Hugs, Shellie


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Shellie’s Shrimp and Grits!

Hello folks and welcome back to the All Things Southern kitchen. Brace yourself, fellow southerners.

It has come to my attention that some of my readers have never had Shrimp and Grits. I am prone to forgetting that we have people with us who aren’t from around here but never fear. I’m prepared to fix this. My Shrimp and Grits recipe is killer good and I’m about to walk y’all through it.

“Shellie’s Shrimp and Grits”

1 to 1 and ½ pounds fresh shrimp

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 stick of butter
1 bag of frozen chopped onion, bell pepper, and celery
Salt and pepper to taste
1/2 teaspoon cayenne
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
2 cans of RoTel Tomatoes
5 cups milk
2 cups old fashioned grits
Green onions
1 pound sharp white cheddar cheese, grated
1 8oz. package cream cheese

dinnerWe’ll begin by taking a heavy pot and heating a tablespoon of olive oil and a stick of butter. Then we’ll sauté our bag of frozen onions, celery, and bell pepper along with some salt, cayenne, and black pepper. Once the veggies are soft, we’ll add two cans of Rotel tomatoes and a tablespoon of chopped garlic.

Dear ones, this should go without saying, but please don’t use the Instant variety, or the quick grits. Purchase only the old fashioned grits or our grandmothers will roll over in their graves! That said, we will now add five cups of milk to our veggies and bring it to a boil. Then we’ll reduce the heat and stir in two cups of our uncooked old fashioned grits. That’s going to make a lot of grits but they’re great for breakfast the next morning.

Folks, we’ll stir until the grits are tender and creamy, about twenty minutes. Then we’ll stir in a pound of sharp cheddar cheese and an eight ounce package of cream cheese. You’re not going to find those cheeses in all shrimp and grits recipes but I double dog dare you to try mine and see if it doesn’t embarrass some of those imposters!  Meanwhile, we’ll take our freshly peeled shrimp, sprinkle Tonys Chacheres’s over them and broil ‘em in the oven just until they’re pink and sprinkle ‘em with lemon juice. Three to five minutes, tops on those babies! Now for the good part! We’ll ladle our grits into bowls, top with the shrimp and garnish with chopped green onions. UM, UMMMMMMMMM! It’s game on, folks. Enjoy Shellie’s Shrimp and Grits. It’s good eating from the All Things Southern kitchen to yours!


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